Hand Stitches: Tutorial Like A Pro

In today’s post, we are going to know the main hand stitches that should not be missing in a sample book. If you need to review the essential tools and steps you can do it in Hand Sewing.

Once you have the sewing kit ready and a seat with very fluffy cushions, we can start the class!

There are many hand-sewing stitches, many of them being variations on the basic stitches.

The points that we are going to see are:

  • Bastille point
  • Backstitch or backstitch
  • Overcasting
  • Vertical drawstring point
  • Scapular Point
  • Invisible hem point
  • Loose threads

Once we have these basic points at hand, the rest is easy to learn as their execution is very similar. All stitches have a meaning to be worked; throughout the post, the indications are for right-handed, if you are left-handed, you have to do it the other way around!

Bastille point

Similar to basting (the length of the stitch and space determine it) but for decorative purposes, it works from right to left.

Bastille point

Back point

It is a stronger point and is used to join pieces. Done from right to left, taking out the needle and sticking it to your right to form the stitch. It is like a hemstitch but it forms the stitch with a backstitch, which adds more security to the seam. This type of stitch is more durable and difficult to undo.

In the following images, you can see the back point on the right and the reverse of the work.

Back point
see the back point

Overcasting

Stitching along the cut edges of the fabric to prevent fraying. Work from right to left, with a single thread, giving diagonal stitches.

After testing this point, the zigzag of the sewing machine is further valued!

Overcasting

Vertical drawstring point

It is a strong and resistant point to join two layers of fabric permanently.

It is often used to sew linings and bias strips. Done from right to left, with short straight stitches on the edge of the fabric.

Vertical drawstring point

The vertical drawstring point seen from the reverse is very different from its front part. But since its purpose is not to be seen, there it is!

vertical drawstring point seen from the reverse

Scapular Point

One of my favorite points, very useful, since it also admits certain movement. Used to join hems and interlinings.

In this case, the scapular point is worked from right to left.

  • We give a small horizontal stitch on the fabric.
Scapular Point
  • And then in the other, so that the thread is intersecting.
thread is intersecting

Invisible hem point

As the name implies, it is used to sew hems and pass through the right side of the fabric as invisible.

It works from right to left and the reverse of the work.

  • Pull the needle out through the fold at the hem.
Pull the needle out through
  • Make a small horizontal stitch in the fabric taking a maximum of one or two threads.

Keep in mind that these stitches are the little we will see from the front, so let’s be meticulous!

these stitches are the little
  • Stick the needle at the point from which we had taken it.
  • Pull the needle into the fold at the hem part about a centimeter away.
Pull the needle into the fold

And we start the series again:

  • Make a small horizontal stitch in the fabric taking a maximum of one or two threads.
Make a small horizontal stitch
  • Nail the needle at the point from which we had drawn it and take it out in the fold of the hem part.
Nail the needle at the point

This is the invisible hem stitch seen from the reverse.

invisible hem stitch

And seen from the right. When we use matching yarn, it is invisible to the eye!

Loose threads

They are so endearing that despite not being an official stitch, they have made a place for themselves in this compilation. Loose threads work as signals on pattern pieces cut into the fabric. It is an alternative way to mark lines and contours on the fabric without using pencils, chalk or roulette.

Work from right to left on two layers of tissue, transferring to both the marks we make with these points.

  • Sew at the hemstitch, without fully stretching the thread in each stitch.
Sew at the hem stitch
  • Once the loose stitches are made, separate the two layers of fabric so that the stitches made of thread loops are taut.
loose stitches
  • Cut in half this thread path.
Cut in half this thread path

Each fabric layer has the marks of the threads. The only but of the matter is that you have to be careful with these angel hairs because with the rub between tissues and movements they come off easily.

rub between tissues

Having seen the main stitches by hand, now it’s time to put them into practice!

Do you have a favorite stitch or one that you use a lot? Or, on the contrary, do you prefer to sew everything by machine even if there are parts that suffer a little from control?

We want to hear your experiences and opinions!

A hug,

Robin

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